Sunday, July 21, 2013

A Nod to Ginsberg: an american sentence



curled and yellowed pining tucked in a notebook can’t persuade the absent.









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33 comments:

  1. ha..great little line...all the answers in the world stuck in a notebook add up to naught....

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  2. ah the one line poem is something I really enjoy more than haiku because it is a better form to reflect our culture and sensibilty. Interesting that the poet who gave us "Howl" is the one who created a form that shows us how beautiful the distilled is, too.

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    1. you know i have never really tried it...i need to....def a ginsberg fan....

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    2. I'd love to see what you'd pack in 17 syllables. :-)

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  3. I met him once, and he signed my copies of "Howl" and "Iron Horse". He was at the Mayflower book store in Berkley.

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  4. I was "out of it" in those days but am really liking "beat poetry" anew through dVerse. In my post healing oneness, I'm finding notes of incomprehensible scribblings that at one time were important enough to write down. Now I'm discarding that past. They will never mean anything to me again because whichever part of me knew what it meant is not transformed. So much writing lead the way in our lives...I think it might be that way with us born writers. Interesting to find these once treasures and sometimes still treasures tucked away where/when we least expect to find them. In my world, I truly believe finding the poetry above has some kind of synchronicity for you. It's lost until it's meant to be found...

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  5. Maggie, your interpretation sent shivers through me because when I wrote this my poetry wasn't lost. Not long ago though my computer crashed and almost a decade of work died with it. Can't explain the loss( we're going to see if the hard drive can be restored). There's more, I had another blog as you might have read. I forgot the password so it's frozen in time. Recently I started going through the archives retrieving a portion of my work. I didn't even bother until I found new community with poets like you. Thank you.

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  6. I love writing in this manner..it says so much, but leaves the reader to fill in the blanks with their own thoughts/experiences.

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    1. I love the distilled. This form feel natural to me. Thank you.

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  7. a single statement with a profound meaning.. wonderful.. :-)

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  8. Loooooooooooooooooooove Ginsberg!

    So much PASSION)))))

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  9. Succinct and thought-provoking.

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  10. I also love the one sentence form--and you say so much here--for me--filled with a longing

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    1. Ah, now I have your blog added to my blogroll. :-) Thank you.

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  11. This is the first one-sentence poem I have ever read...thought-provoking fare!

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  12. I like to peek on that notebook ~

    There is something potent about writing short verses as it makes you choose your words carefully ~

    I think you will like the landay (Afghanistan) form - We tried it before in RT and produced some outstanding and relevant poems ~

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    1. Grace, I commented on your landay form and I recommended a novel written in almost entirely verse similar to the landay form. The reason why I am drawn to poetry and short forms in particular is exactly that- unlike a novel, poetry is distilled. Poetry requires that you choose your words carefully. I was taught the same about prose though with prose, there is wiggle room.

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  13. I didn't know that Ginsberg came up with this, and the irony is not lost on me.

    Too true, your words. Like good intentions, right, those words hidden away... Amy

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  14. Loved the form and the sentiment-- reminds me to try the one-liner :) Thanks for the notion ~peace, Jason

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  15. Wow! 17 syllables without the three line regimen is very cool--at lest when you write them. I didn't know Ginsberg did but I am definitely going to try this. I noticed that your blog text above is also 17 syllables: a midlife cliff to leap from. The one for today is doubly wonderful, because, I assume the pining journalist is as absent as what she once upon a time desired.

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    1. Susan, besides writing itself, a writer loves the astute reader. Thank you.

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  16. A thought becomes image, image becomes words, words flow like water with meaning in each molecule!

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  17. Sigh... Very true, LaTonya! Love the image of the "curled and yellow pining."

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  18. Replies
    1. Welcome to Black and Gray, Kate. Thank you.

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  19. Good American sentence, La Tonya.

    Pamela

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  20. That is a fabulous one line. I took a workshop with him once, we made a group poem out of these one liners, it was fabulous.

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    1. Can only imagine. I'm sure an incredible experience.

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